Category Archives: Cub Scouts

Making the World Safe for Diversity

Sincerely submitted by Francisco Guzman, Scout parent, Cubmaster Pack 109, Leader Troop 109, Chelsea

“We all should know that diversity makes for a rich tapestry, and we must understand that all the threads of the tapestry are equal in value no matter what their color.”  – Maya Angelou

Three boyhood friends, one Asian, one African American and one Caucasian walk into the Bar at the Ritz.  They all grew up together, went to Milton Academy, and recently all graduated from Harvard Business School…  This may be the beginning of a joke, but the question I would ask is, are they a diverse group?  My answer would be NO!  Diversity is more that race or ethnicity; it is a group of people from diverse racial, ethnic, social, religious, educational, financial, life experience and cultural backgrounds working together for a common goal.   The above group may be of different races, and possibly other factors, but the all share an equal cultural and social foundation.img_20150731_145854

The recent acts of race and ethnic base violence became a catalyst for my second blog.  Part of the reason is that I am trying to come to understand something that is beyond my understanding, how people make decisions and act on them based solely on someone’s race or ethnic background.  The other part is to share how lucky I am that our Scout group in Chelsea has remained free of any ethnic or racial discord.

My upbringing did not prepare me for the racial tensions that are so much in the news.  Having grown up in Puerto Rico, a community as racially diverse as you will find, we could not understand the racial tension shown on American TV during the 60’s and 70’s.  Our running joke in those days was that if we were racist, we would start by hating ourselves!

When my wife and I restarted the Cub Scout Pack in Chelsea, we made a decision to actively recruit Scouts from every race, ethnicity, social class, religion etc.  We did not want a Hispanic or any specific ethnicity group.  img_20160315_190121It was important to me to try to recreate the Scout experience I was involved in as a youth.  Fortunately our neighborhoods are exactly like that.  The Chelsea schools are integrated regardless of any traits from preschool on.  All kids learn early on to work with other children regardless of appearance or any other differences.

As much as younger children do not have any preconceived ideas of hatred or racial bias, unfortunately parts of our society seems to very easily teach our children about it.  It has been our priority as Scout leaders to keep those divisive issues from our Boy Scout program.  We emphasize from day one, that we are stronger because of our differences, not in spite of them.  Our Scouts learn to judge each other based on actions and behaviors, not on skin color, country of origin or language spoken.

By using the values taught in Scouting, we are able to keep at bay the negative values that seem to run freely thru our society today.  We teach our scouts to value cooperation vs. winning at all cost; the importance of community betterment vs. self gain; the importance of trustworthiness vs. selfishness.  These are the values Scouting instills on our children and teen agers, and we must continue focusing on those values.

Unfortunately, the foundation of Scouting as a community base organization, can also be use to foster those negative values.  We must remain vigilant against some of the more narrow minded and bigoted views within our movement that want to return to the “olden days”.  The future of our communities and our program will be on how it deals with those that are different from “us”.  Every time I hear the old “but this is how we have always done it” my stomach churns.  This excuse has been used for generations to allow for everything from slavery to segregation; from withholding education from girls and children with special needs to withholding equal pay for women or other special or disenfranchised groups.

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Presently we have 25-30 Scouts from several countries, religions, races and at least 5 different languages.  We have Scouts with physical, emotional and intellectual disabilities.  We have Scouts from financially challenged families and Scouts whose families can help and contribute.  At our recent summer camp I was stuck by the fact that on the second night of the week long summer camp I had 3 homesick Scouts, all three were different races, ethnicities and which all spoke different languages.  When the tears came, some of the other Scouts jumped into action.  Amazingly, they did not jump in to comfort the children that were “similar” or the same ethnicity or spoke the same language as them, they just helped a Scout. It was not based on race, or ethnicity or language, just simply Scouts helping other Scouts.  That was all the proof I needed that we are on the right track, we just need to persevere.  MLK’s famous speech was about his dream, I am happy to see Chelsea’s Scout group bringing that dream a little closer to reality.

Please join us on Saturday, October 29th, at New England Base Camp’s Camp Sayre in Milton, MA

“The war we have to wage today has only one goal and that is to make the world safe for diversity.” – U Thant (Former Secretary General of the U.N.)

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All You Have To Do Is Ask!

My dad always told me “all you have to do is ask”. Yes, that statement has very much to do with a father daughter relationship, but being a Scouter for me has always been about the “Ask”. My dad taught me that it is ok to ask people for help and in return be at the ready to help others if asked.   What does my relationship with my dad have to do with helping Scouting Thrive?

Sometimes just asking is the hardest part. Over the course of my years as a Scouter I have never succeeded at anything on my own. I have had to ask 100’s of people to help make it happen: a Blue and Gold for almost 400 people, a raingutter regatta for a district, selling $57,000 in popcorn, and Pumpkin Fest for 3000 people at New England Base Camp. I have had to do a lot of asking and thankfully enough many, many, many people have said “Yes, I will help!”
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Collectively we have delivered great programs to thousands of Scouts over the years and I am inspired by the level of commitment and talent you can find within the Scouting community. It is amazing how someone can take a simple idea and deliver something that will last in the minds of our young Scouts for a lifetime just because they were asked.
Sometimes we prompt the ask in a conversation with other leaders and parents by saying “What can I do to help?” Because we all want to help, Don’t We? We often just do not know how. Well here it is how the “Ask” helps Scouting Thrive, someone tells us what they need us to do by asking us a very specific question.

pfestI was asked to be the Registrar for S.OA.R – Scouting’s Outdoor Adventure on the River, they asked “Can you help us get 10,000 people to come to the Charles River in October of 2016”. A specific question…okay, I was crazy enough to say yes (my dad would remind me that it is good to be helpful) and now it is my turn to ask you something.

Have you registered for S.O.A.R? You can help us by signing up your Troop, Crew, Post,
Pack, or Ship to come and joins us on the Banks of the Charles River! Visit http://soar2016.us

popcorn-1Have you encouraged others to attend Scouting’s Outdoor Adventure on the River? You can help us by working with the Pack’s in your town to coordinate Webelos Camping Overnight for the event with your Troop.
As a unit leader have you shared S.O.A.R. information about how to register with your families if needed? You can share event details and registration information. Share http://soar2016.us

Have you signed up to volunteer for S.O.A.R.? You can help us by signing up to volunteer! Visit http://staff.soar2016.us/ to sign up today!
You can share with others and let them know that your unit has registered for Scouting’s Outdoor Adventurer on the River and that you are ready to for a memorable adventure with 10,000 new Scouting Friends on Columbus Day Weekend.
You can help us by joining our S.O.A.R. Facebook Event Page let us know you are coming. Better yet Join and Share our S.O.A.R. Facebook Event Page!

Don’t know how you can help – Guess what? Ask me! Email register@soar2016.us – I have just the Job for YOU!

soar-meeting-1Over this past year, teams of volunteers have been planning, emailing, phone calling, attending countless meetings, all to make S.O.A.R. a quality event that will be sure to provide countless memories that will stay with you and the youth we serve for years to come , all because someone asked. Now it is your turn, I ask you to help us by saying yes to any or all of the questions above!

See you on the Banks of the Charles River October 8-10, 2016…Come Join the Adventure!

Telling Our Story: Promoting Your Cub Scout Pack

Submitted by Matt Bailey, Cubmaster, Pack 28 Wenham

Last year, I recall reading a Council blog about a focus group held at New England Base Camp with non Scouting families. My takeaway was families once exposed to the Scouting program thought it was awesome but they also told us they saw Scouting a closed system and as outsiders did not know how to access Scouting.

I thought this was a terrific insight and thought if we can get our message out and promote an invitational environment, we may just be able to grow the program.

Now, I have enjoyed some recent success getting our Pack’s story in the local press. It wasn’t easy.

I spent a year submitting photos and articles and getting no results. My wife and I spoke with reporters and editors at our local weekly and delivered a similar response.

“We have been sending pictures and articles but nothing gets published. I’m good if you don’t print our stuff, just let me know and I won’t bother taking the time to submit articles”.

What changed? We did.

Our media friends, want photos and stories about our Scouts doing something exciting. Let our Scouts tell the story. Show the Scouting spirit.

So, here are the secrets:

  1. Make it easy for the press.
  2. Give them action photos and an engaging headline.
  3. Close up photos work best.

So, if we write the story we want to tell, in they way the press likes they may just print the whole thing.

Wow! Think about that for a moment…

We have an opportunity to engage potential recruits, stakeholders and the communities we serve at zero cost. We also get to define the Scouting brand in our community. People have a fuzzy impression of what Scouting is about and so if we create a mental picture of Scouting in our local community we may be more successful recruiting new members and engaging adult participation.

So, why would the press be interested in Scouting?

  • We have great activities no one else is doing.
  • Cub Scout photos show authentic excitement.
  • We are local.
  • Our content is free. No payments to freelancers or staff reporters.
  • Cub Scout parents are a demographic that might not buy newspapers and who the print media may want to engage…and the demographic that buys newspapers loves Scouting.

Here an example of a good, but ineffective, effort…

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Headline: Pack 28 Pinewood Derby Race Winners Announced Group shot of a Pinewood Derby finalists. (NOT Published)

This is an example of why close ups are important. A good close up eliminates visual clutter that may not be appealing to an editor. It is also a lot easier to take a three great individual photos than a group shot.

The below articles were published and I included one photo from the final article; however each article had a multiple photos that made it to print and I did not include the narrative portion. A common theme among all that were printed were great photos of Scouts genuinely excited about Scouting. All three events, were also open to new recruits and we had new visitors.

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Headline: Cub Scouts Ignite Interest in STEM / Photo Caption: Caeden and Owen very proud of the rockets they made (PUBLISHED)

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Headline: Pack 28 Holds Annual Fishing Derby / Photo Caption: Pack 28 held their 2016 Fishing Derby at Pleasant Pond in Wenham. Gabe won the award for the smallest fish. (PUBLISHED)

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Headline: Wenham Cub Scouts Catch Olympic Spirit / Photo Caption: Avery clears the mud pit and stays dry.(PUBLISHED)

So, you may say, that’s great but: 1) you aren’t a professional photographer, 2) you are not in PR and 3) you don’t have time.

No worries. Most of these photos were taken on a smartphones, all by amateurs.

The story is a simple one to write using a common recipe. It does need to be produced soon after the event to be newsworthy.

  • Headline: Cub Scouts did something fun, outdoors and unique
  • Story: Pack 1 Cub Scouts had a great experience doing something fun, learning something new.
  • Pictures: Close ups of excited Cub Scouts doing an activity. Send files as a .jpg attachment.
  • Closing: Cub Scouts is a year-round outdoor program for boys in grades 15. For more information contact: _____________.

So, why make the effort?

We have a great story to tell. Press coverage instills as sense of pride in Scouts about their program and unit. It helps define the Scouting brand in your town. It validates our Scouts. At our feeder school, press clippings of students are posted in a prominent location a common practice. Because of the nature of our program as civically engaged and offering unique programming we have the ability to generate press other youth activities can only hope to create. Finally, telling our story in an invitational way will help to address a perception of Scouting as a closed system and open for new members.

Our Council also has the ability to help your Pack get PR at a greater level for seriously awesome events and activities. Check out the examples from Pack 126, Wilmington this Spring:

If you are having an event of this nature that you feel deserves broader press than just within your community, please contact Brice Pearce, our Communications and Sales Manager via email or Facebook.

Our Pass to Family Adventure

Submitted by Chris Jackson, Cubmaster, Pack 137 (Lexington)

Our family’s Scouting adventure started three years ago when our son saw some pictures of Pack 137 in Lexington’s previous trip to the Battleship Massachusetts. He HAD to go. He had no idea what else the Scouts did he just knew that if it included sleeping on a battleship he was in.

Since then we have become increasingly involved in the pack and with District events. Two years of Pumpkinfest (for 2 children), two years of Day camp, this year’s Overnight camp and a host of other events around our Council.

But while we have been able to do some fantastic things with the Scouts we still had to CHOOSE what events we took part in as the cost has just been prohibitive for a family of four. STEM Camp, several weekend events, and even family camp have all come second place for the main opportunities our family wanted to take advantage of.

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What the card will do for us is open up those missed opportunities.  With a large discount off overnight camp and STEM camp, we have the opportunity for him to work on Robotics and Chemistry while also keeping up with the archery, BBs, and outdoor camping he loves.  We can avoid the weekends where we struggle with “Tablet time/Screen time” and he and his sister can make New England Base Camp their second “outdoor” home.  Surprise weekend trips to one of the other camps for a day of waterfront hijinks he can share with his cousin (who he considers his best friend) now become an easy choice over a visit to a town pool or rec center.

Our son is 9.  After three years in the program he has set his sights on earning his Eagle, joining Venturing, and traveling the country (and the world) through Scouting activities. Lofty goals for sure, but not out of the question and our family will be behind him supporting him all the way. With the opportunities given to us by the New England Adventure Card program it feels like our Council is there supporting us, and allowing him to immerse himself in the Scouting experience at a level we would struggle to do without it.

I Love Scouting for ME.

Submitted by Kim Lynch, Cubmaster (Pack 105, Burlington), Teacher, Mom, and Wife

My first year of being Cubmaster is coming to an end, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked why I do it. The answers always revolve around my sons: Jarrod (a Boy Scout), Dylan (a Wolf),  and another coming into Cub Scouts in a few more years. Lynch1I start my answer with a description of loyally cheering Scouts at a Pinewood Derby, or a thrifty and creative Recyclable Rain Gutter Regatta, occasionally I include the helpful relationships between Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts (I often use this one). Maybe I include the enjoyment of warm campfires, silly skits and scrumptious s’mores, but sometimes I simply focus on the morals that Scouting instills and how they revolve around teaching boys to be good men and dads later in life.

My answers always encompass what Scouting offers my children.

It’s here that I came to realize something a little different. I love Scouting for me. As new members to our local community, Jarrod and I forged relationships we still enjoy today; people I trust with my son in every way; people who have fought for him and supported him and helped me to feel trust. Now, as a Cubmaster, I enjoy friendships that extend well past Scouting. We look forward to our monthly leader meetings where we come together as friends and plan for our next meetings.

We all enjoy our Scouting fun and our many Scouting adventures and we have similar interests as well. This year a few of us from the Wolf den enjoyed a family adventure. Our Lynch4thrill ride took us up a mountain trail in New Hampshire together. We celebrate birthdays together or even just a fire side night out. Scouting brought us all together as friends. Our similar philosophies brought us to Cub Scouting and in turn to each other.

Our differences make us strong leaders. We have a tech-savvy spreadsheet creating wiz, a hands-on crafty queen, a saleswoman-forward-thinking diva, along with an innovative idea king and a Shriner Clown who’s always willing to share a laugh or twist a balloon. Our values tie us or should I say ‘knot’ us together both in and out of Scouting.

So when people say it’s hard to make new friends, I disagree. Knowing who you are and going out in search of it will bring you right to them.
From now on, when I answer the questions about loving Scouting, I will still start off with the many rewards my children reap, those all encompassing values, but I will equally emphasize what Scouting does for me!Lynch2

Spring into STEM Camp

Spring is almost here and the April vacation will be here before you realize it.  The question that always comes up is, “what to do with the kids?”  You could always keep them home and let them watch television all day, but we have a better idea!  Send them to New England Base Camp for STEM Camp!

Jobs within the STEM (Science, Technology, Math, and Engineering) industry are growing at nearly twice the national average, meaning there will be well over 1 million unfilled tech jobs by 2020! Careers in STEM foster valuable 21st century life skills like problem-solving, creativity, and collaboration, while providing opportunities to create positive change and innovate a better world.  Not to mention that it is fun.

STEM Camp 2016 is bigger than ever!  This year, we will be hosting Peter and Paul Reynolds who will be teaching Animation Merit Badge with the animators at FableVisionWill Bales, from the TV show BattleBots, will be at camp teaching robotics to Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts. NVBots will be at camp teaching 3D printing.  We cannot forget about the paleontologists, meteorologists, astronauts, robots and drones coming as well.   Everyone will be taking a field trip this year.  Participants will be going to MIT, Lincoln Labs, iRobot, FableVision, Harvard, Wentworth Institute of Technology and many more.

We have added more sessions for the Boy Scout Merit Badge program.  Scouts can choose between Animation Merit Badge, Energy and Electricity Merit Badges, Inventing and Engineering Merit Badges, Nuclear Science and Drafting Merit Badges, Robotics Merit Badge, Space Exploration and Weather Merit Badges.  Cub Scouts will work on a multitude of Activity Badges.  Girl Scouts will be able to work on their awards and everyone works towards their NOVA award.

Bring your child to STEM Camp at New England Base Camp for chance to learn while having the time of their lives.

A Night at the Museum (of Science)

One Dad’s perspective on the Cub Scout overnight at the Museum of Science
By Ted Cormier-Leger, Pack 7 Dedham

Back in the fall, my son’s Cubmaster gave us the pitch about selling popcorn as a way to help support the pack and in return we would get some nice perks too.  One of those perks was my son would get to go the Museum of Science.

So like good Scouts we sold what we had to and eagerly waited for when our pack would get assigned its night at the museum.  I too was excited because I knew it was a parent and son program and something we could enjoy together.  After all, I remember going to the Museum as a kid many times on school field trips and such but I never got to sleep over.  I wonder if we can sleep under the T-Rex?  I wonder if they still have the planetarium?  Oh wow, I remember that lightning show being scary, so I hope my son is not freaked out.  These were a few of the things that passed through my mind.

So a few months later we got our date.  Sat night in mid February.  What I did not realize was MOST of the boys in my son’s Wolf Den were attending.  Now fear was starting to set in.  Were these little hellions going to be up all night?  What if they break something priceless? What if they accidentally reprogram the museum’s computers?  What if they take all the parents hostage and tie us up all night so they run free?  All very legit concerns for this particular group of 7 and 8 year old boys.

Charlie at deskThe afternoon had finally arrived and my son was very excited.  He wore his full uniform to the museum, proudly adorning all his accomplishments for the year.

We packed lightly but I was warned by more than one chaperone “bring an air mattress” so I did.  We got to the museum, checked in and soon I saw that not only was I chaperoning the scouts from my son’s pack but more than 200 boys were there from around New England.  Was I insane?  I was agreeing to spend the night in a science museum with 200+ little boys, surrounded by dinosaurs, relics of ancient civilizations, live animals and enough sugary snacks to keep them awake for a decade.  Luckily I was pleasantly surprised….

  • We got to see an awesome demo on the history of animation.
  • We enjoyed a live animal show.
  • We explored the dinosaur hall and other exhibits.
  • We saw the amazing indoor lightning show which was just as cool as I remembered.
  • We learned about space exploration and the distance of planets in relation to the sun.
  • We even got snack and all this before 11pm!

Bedtime came and we all got our stuff.  Air mattresses were being blown up everywhere you looked.  One family had a setup complete with sheets, pillows and a comforter.  It looked better than many rooms I have stayed in at 4 star hotels.  I think they even brought slippers!  I looked around and tried to find a spot near a power outlet so I could charge my cell phone.  I set up our mattress and sleeping bags and quickly more and more boys kept coming over to my general area.  Uh oh.

Turns out the glass display on the other side of my sleeping area was the baby chicken hatching station. Lucky me.  Three little guys decided that night would be their birthday!  The kids were excited but as the night went on, those little chicks went from being cute to being thought of in a delicious buffalo sauce.  They chirped and chirped and well, I did not get much sleep.  But it’s for the kids right?

Morning came and we got changed, got cleaned up as best we could and we got all our stuff packed away in our car.  We were treated to a nice breakfast and a morning full of more activities….an Imax theatre film, a planetarium show, more exhibit halls, another live animal show.  Good grief, they sure do pack it all in and 100% give you your money’s worth.  By noon on Sunday, no matter how strong the iced coffee was from the café, I was all done and we needed to get going so we headed home.

Cub Scout Charlie had another awesome experience and I lived to tell the tale.  And I am so glad and thankful for my night with the baby chicks.

Why Do We Camp?

To experience the wilderness? To be with friends? To challenge our skills? To explore?

All of this, and something even more. Camping is pure. It’s an opportunity to strip away the pressure of the day and focus on more important things. As the Scoutmaster, you can leave the stress of work behind and focus on helping others.

For the Scouts, they leave behind their school and part-time job concerns, desire for academic achievements, athletic competition, and social pressures. They are free to roam at camp like nowhere else (Obviously, we know where they are at all times, and they are in a safe environment). Within that wilderness space they can let go and explore. As a Council, we spend enormous time, effort and resources scheduling merit badges, building ropes courses, improving facilities, launching boats, and dozens of other activities that add up to “the program.” However, when the Scout comes home after the week at camp and his mom asks him what was the best part about camp, he says “I caught a frog!” Or “Billy laughed so hard milk came out his nose.” Two things he could’ve done on any given Saturday in the backyard.

If that’s the highlight, why do we camp?

We are grateful that he has fun memories when he’s 11 years old. But those memories change and evolve over time. As he grows he learns to articulate different memories from his camp experience. When you ask a 17-year-old about camp he references camaraderie. Ask a 25-year-old to reflect on his youthful camp experience and he talks about independence. When you ask 40 year-old he talks about learning responsibility in camp. Responsibility he never would’ve learned anywhere else. The place that prepared him to to be a father. Ask a 55 year old and he’ll reflect on learning leadership that, in retrospect, has guided him ever since. Ask a 70 year old and he’ll reminisce about the milk coming out of Billy’s nose 😉

So, why do we camp?

It provides life changing opportunities and builds life-long bonds. Deeper than they first appear, and they fill our personal memory reservoir. Camp is a wonderful mixture of authentic challenges, metaphorical lessons, and unparalleled fun. The scouting community (Scoutmasters, Scouts, camp staff and the physical property) all work together – like a recipe to make the experience work.

Building and developing the Northern Nexus and the Spirit of Adventure is an authentic challenge. It’s the challenge that makes the victory taste so sweet. We are glad to announce all the registrations for the much anticipated inaugural summer at Northern Nexus (Wah-Tut-Ca, Storer and Parker) can be found HERE.

The Benefits of Active Parenting

Submitted by Ted Cormier-Leger, Cub Scout Dad, Pack 7, Dedham, MA

A little over 5 years ago, we got a call that our application to become pre-adoptive, foster parents was approved and our social worker had a little boy in mind for us to meet.  Since we had just completed the state’s required classes and home study visits, we thought we would have to wait a lot longer so the call came as quite a surprise.  Were we ready?  What were we going to do with him?  Would he like us?  Would he get along with our dogs?  So we forged ahead and figured this was part of some larger plan.  We went to the house where Charlie was staying.  He had just turned 2.  It was the summer so he was running around with only a diaper on.  He hid behind the couch and peeked around at us.  He smiled and giggled and ran away to some other part of the house.  Needless to say it was love at first sight.  He was non verbal at that point but he knew various signs to tell us what he wanted.  He quickly won his way into our hearts and shortly after came to live with us.

Having a son brought back lots of great memories for me.  Especially those that involved Scouting.  Whether it was sitting in den meetings in our kitchen with my mom as our den leader or building my first Pinewood Derby car with my dad in our basement, Scouting played a critical role in my young life.  Sports were never really my thing back then despite trying really hard.  I got hit by the pitch way more than I have connected the bat to the ball.  Scouts was different.  I could learn new stuff, play, laugh with other kids, go on adventures and just be myself.  I am also confident that because I had such a great experience in Cub Scouts, I stayed with the program as a Boy Scout and later attained my Eagle.  (I could also talk about all my great summers at camp, both as a Scout and on staff or even delve into my trip to Philmont, but I think I will save those stories for another time.)

So when the opportunity came for my son to become a Cub Scout, I was so excited to bring him to the first meeting.

Seeing him in his full uniform and a big smile across his face brought a little tear to my eye. At the first meeting, all of the parents decided to divide and conquer so we each would take turns with delivering the lessons and activities to the kids each month.  Within a month, Charlie earned his Bobcat as well as his first belt loop and he was beaming to get those awards at the pack meeting from the Cubmaster (with proud dad standing beside him of course).

If you have the opportunity to work closely with your child on anything, I suggest you grab it.  If that opportunity is with Scouting, that is great.  My mom and dad were not spectators watching my young life go by.  They were involved, they cared, they took risks.  They did stuff with me.  I want to be that parent for my son and I encourage you to do the same.

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Parents + Day Camp = Quality Family Memories

Submitted by Brice Pearce, Cub Scout Camping Advisor

Just a few years ago, back in 2012, I began to work with Day Camp for the first time. Initially, I thought it would be just like Boy Scout resident camping, only the days would be shorter. Boy, was I both right and wrong…

Not having children myself, I must admit I wasn’t sure what to expect of the parent/youth interaction… You don’t see a ton of this at Boy Scout resident camp, and, at an older age, you are definitely encouraging more independence from the youth.

What I have observed over the last few years focusing on Cub Scout programming has been truly amazing, and life-changing for many families.

I have watched several parents become amazing Cub Scout leaders, simply because they came to a camping event with their scout and had a good time. I have seen children gain confidence while learning new skills with their parents, and the parents smile as they see this happen. I have seen parents gain new skills, without realizing it, and then develop those skills into new passions. And, I have seen parents discover, some for the very first time, how to simply play with their child. This is totally in-line with what is expressed in a recent article in the Boston Parents Paper (“Learning Beyond Class”), looking at the instructive value of play when choosing extracurricular activities that focus on the acquisition of “skills that can be acquired through participation, practice, and performance.”

When people ask me what the value of Cub Scouting, is, I give an answer that I don’t hear expressed very often:
By spending time with your child in Scouting, and allowing them to see you have fun learning new things alongside of them, you are creating a bond that you could not pay for later in life.

So, as you think about Day Camp this summer, and are making those decisions around dollars and cents, schedules, daycare, and tax write-offs, think about the investment that you need to make in your child’s life.

When you register your children for Day Camp this summer, why not take some of your vacation time to come play with them, and spend a few days smiling together?

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Spirit of Adventure Day Camps open for registration Saturday, January 16th, at 8am HERE.

For more information, see our short video and our online magazine.

Engage with our Facebook pages for the Chelmsford, Topsfield, and Greater Boston areas, as well as our premier camping facilities at New England Base Camp in Milton, MA, and Lone Tree Scout Reservation in Kingston, NH.