Category Archives: For Leaders

Telling Our Story: Promoting Your Cub Scout Pack

Submitted by Matt Bailey, Cubmaster, Pack 28 Wenham

Last year, I recall reading a Council blog about a focus group held at New England Base Camp with non Scouting families. My takeaway was families once exposed to the Scouting program thought it was awesome but they also told us they saw Scouting a closed system and as outsiders did not know how to access Scouting.

I thought this was a terrific insight and thought if we can get our message out and promote an invitational environment, we may just be able to grow the program.

Now, I have enjoyed some recent success getting our Pack’s story in the local press. It wasn’t easy.

I spent a year submitting photos and articles and getting no results. My wife and I spoke with reporters and editors at our local weekly and delivered a similar response.

“We have been sending pictures and articles but nothing gets published. I’m good if you don’t print our stuff, just let me know and I won’t bother taking the time to submit articles”.

What changed? We did.

Our media friends, want photos and stories about our Scouts doing something exciting. Let our Scouts tell the story. Show the Scouting spirit.

So, here are the secrets:

  1. Make it easy for the press.
  2. Give them action photos and an engaging headline.
  3. Close up photos work best.

So, if we write the story we want to tell, in they way the press likes they may just print the whole thing.

Wow! Think about that for a moment…

We have an opportunity to engage potential recruits, stakeholders and the communities we serve at zero cost. We also get to define the Scouting brand in our community. People have a fuzzy impression of what Scouting is about and so if we create a mental picture of Scouting in our local community we may be more successful recruiting new members and engaging adult participation.

So, why would the press be interested in Scouting?

  • We have great activities no one else is doing.
  • Cub Scout photos show authentic excitement.
  • We are local.
  • Our content is free. No payments to freelancers or staff reporters.
  • Cub Scout parents are a demographic that might not buy newspapers and who the print media may want to engage…and the demographic that buys newspapers loves Scouting.

Here an example of a good, but ineffective, effort…

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Headline: Pack 28 Pinewood Derby Race Winners Announced Group shot of a Pinewood Derby finalists. (NOT Published)

This is an example of why close ups are important. A good close up eliminates visual clutter that may not be appealing to an editor. It is also a lot easier to take a three great individual photos than a group shot.

The below articles were published and I included one photo from the final article; however each article had a multiple photos that made it to print and I did not include the narrative portion. A common theme among all that were printed were great photos of Scouts genuinely excited about Scouting. All three events, were also open to new recruits and we had new visitors.

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Headline: Cub Scouts Ignite Interest in STEM / Photo Caption: Caeden and Owen very proud of the rockets they made (PUBLISHED)

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Headline: Pack 28 Holds Annual Fishing Derby / Photo Caption: Pack 28 held their 2016 Fishing Derby at Pleasant Pond in Wenham. Gabe won the award for the smallest fish. (PUBLISHED)

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Headline: Wenham Cub Scouts Catch Olympic Spirit / Photo Caption: Avery clears the mud pit and stays dry.(PUBLISHED)

So, you may say, that’s great but: 1) you aren’t a professional photographer, 2) you are not in PR and 3) you don’t have time.

No worries. Most of these photos were taken on a smartphones, all by amateurs.

The story is a simple one to write using a common recipe. It does need to be produced soon after the event to be newsworthy.

  • Headline: Cub Scouts did something fun, outdoors and unique
  • Story: Pack 1 Cub Scouts had a great experience doing something fun, learning something new.
  • Pictures: Close ups of excited Cub Scouts doing an activity. Send files as a .jpg attachment.
  • Closing: Cub Scouts is a year-round outdoor program for boys in grades 15. For more information contact: _____________.

So, why make the effort?

We have a great story to tell. Press coverage instills as sense of pride in Scouts about their program and unit. It helps define the Scouting brand in your town. It validates our Scouts. At our feeder school, press clippings of students are posted in a prominent location a common practice. Because of the nature of our program as civically engaged and offering unique programming we have the ability to generate press other youth activities can only hope to create. Finally, telling our story in an invitational way will help to address a perception of Scouting as a closed system and open for new members.

Our Council also has the ability to help your Pack get PR at a greater level for seriously awesome events and activities. Check out the examples from Pack 126, Wilmington this Spring:

If you are having an event of this nature that you feel deserves broader press than just within your community, please contact Brice Pearce, our Communications and Sales Manager via email or Facebook.

Troop 3 Milton Comes Home

Submitted by Assistant Scoutmaster Ron Gauld

On July 16, 2016, Troop 3 Milton came home to T.L. Storer.  The troop had not attended a summer camp there in twelve years. So at 9:00 AM on Saturday July 16th, Scoutmaster Dave Humphreys and Assistant Scoutmaster Ron Gauld along with Troop 3 parent Andy Synnott arrived at Adams Field to witness the graduation of four of their Scouts from National Youth Leadership Training (NYLT).  The NYLT contingent along with two younger siblings and two senior scouts who had had been NYLT staff formed the advanced party for the troop’s arrival the next day. So with high spirits after a successful NYLT course, the scouts moved over to Campsite Chippewa and dropped off their gear before heading off to do some required laundry and enjoy some celebratory pizza.

The calls of the ravens with the rising sun woke the early arrivals and breakfast was made and preparations for the Troops arrival were completed. Soon enough the Troop started to arrive and eager scouts started to unload footlockers and bags and unhook bicycles for the upcoming week. Senior Patrol Leader Jackson Humphreys gathered up his key leaders and got the Troop organized. Tents were assigned and the all-important bug netting was set up. The troop then gathered up and off they went on a tour of the camp finding the waterfront for swim testing, COPE and Climbing, the all-important dining hall and the trading post was located for later attack. The final stops on the tour were shooting sports, nature (yea nature!) and the chapel.  Then it was back to Chippewa to finish getting settled and get ready for the first meal of the week. The Troop’s 29 scouts, two adult leaders and two additional parents soon found themselves sitting in the dining hall enjoying a good meal and quickly found the old Troop 3 sign nailed up in the rafters and determined that a new one needed to be made.IMG_0877

Monday morning broke with a little light rain as the Troop raised the colors in the campsite and preparations were made for the first full day at camp.

Locations for merit badges, Trailblazers and Older Scout program were all determined and soon after breakfast off the scouts went eager to start the week off with a bang. Monday afternoon the troop’s senior scouts went up the rifle range where they learned how to load and shoot black powder rifles.  This was a Rare Adventure that they had chosen.

On Tuesday the Magee Cup relay race plan was developed and put into effect. After dinner the runners, bikers, swimmers all were in place. The race was close and the Troop wasIMG_0875 in second place until Quartermaster Andrew Viola, paddling in the kayak leg, powered across Adams pond and took the lead that was never surrendered again. Soon anchor leg runner Patrick Fox crossed the finish line and the Troop had won the Cup. The entire Troop mobbed the winning team and the cup was carried back to the campsite amid laughter and shouts of joy.
A happy group gathered around the campfire that night as each leg of the race was retold in exacting detail and after some impromptu singing and comedy the troop settled into some well-deserved rest.

Wednesday was a big day as soon after lunch the scouts in the Older Scout program left for a bike trek, the troop also had a large group heading off for the Wilderness Survival merit badge overnight. It was a much smaller group that night in the dining hall and enjoyed a meal with the usual singing and silliness that is a part of a scout camp meal.

Thursday morning came as the groups returned to main camp after surviving a night off by themselves. They came home tired but happy and after some showers, food and rest they were off again to play Camp wide games after dinner.

Friday was the lets finish up the merit badge day and get ready for the final campfire. Troop 3 scouts gathered at the fire to watch Scoutmaster Dave Humphreys get his Woodbadge beads before the fun that is a scout campfire started. Songs were sung, jokes were told and James” Jiggles” Disandro and Carl Williams represented the Troop in the program with a well done skit about a ship hitting an iceberg. Soon enough Scout Vespers was sung and the troop quietly returned to Chippewa for the final night of camp.

Saturday morning came all too soon and the troop went to the dining hall for the last breakfast of summer camp 2016. Back in the campsite trunks were packed in preparation for departing Camp TL Storer. Troop 3 had a successful camp, several scouts advanced in rank, and lots of merit badges were earned. The Troop scouts and leaders decided that it was good to be home again.  In that spirit the Troop is hoping to return to its historical roots and stay out at Campsite Sioux and run an old fashioned patrol cooking summer camp in 2017.

Troop 3 Milton would like to say thank you to the Directors and Staff of Camp TL Storer and the rest of the Northern Nexus for a great week. We would also like to say thank you to the parents of the Troop 3 scouts that came up and spent time at the camp assisting the Scoutmasters.  We cannot do it without you.

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Climbing Toward Adventure

Submitted by John Iler, BSA Climbing Instructor, former Scoutmaster of Troop 103, Burlington, MA, and dad.

“OK, I’m going to do this exactly once in my life.” That was my daughter Sarah as she prepared to rappel down a 40′ foot rock face at Quincy Quarries. Climbing/rappelling is just one of the many ways to ‘play outside’ provided by New England Base Camp at Camp Sayre.

Sarah leads a busy life with many high school activities, but she was never really a big outdoors person. However, her Eagle Scout twin brother Luke was very active in his Boy Scout Troop. Sarah enjoyed Luke’s stories of adventure and misadventure as he returned from campouts. She wanted a taste of the camaraderie with good friends, the fun of a campfire and outdoor cooking, and a little adventure. When Burlington’s Venture Crew started two years ago, she jumped at the opportunity to be a founding member.

One of the first adventures the Crew had was the Quincy Quarries rock climbing trip IMG_3611mentioned above. Shortly after that trip, the Crew enjoyed the Venturing Klondike at Base Camp in February 2015. In the abundant snow, Venturers hiked about in snowshoes, went Ice Climbing, and practiced making climbing snow anchors, all within Base Camp. One station embedded in Sarah’s memory was the simulated crevasse rescue. As the first volunteer ‘victim’, Sarah began to lower off the edge of a very real ice and snow covered cliff being used to simulate a crevasse. She gasped slightly, exclaiming, “this is a lot higher than I expected!”. Fortunately, her Crewmates working with the instructors set up the rescue rope and pulley system and hauled her back up over the edge.

The following year (February 2016), Base Camp hosted another Venturing Klondike in
decidedly less Klondike-like conditions. The Base Camp staff and Ice Climbing instructors adjusted the program to deal with the balmy weather and snow-free conditions. The Crew particularly enjoyed the fat-tire bike riding and Base Camp’s High COPE course. When Sarah walked along the COPE course’s 50′ high ‘Burma Bridge’ cable, she let go of another fear.

As Sarah and the Crew prepares to go to Philmont this summer, I know their various Base Camp experiences were a good part of giving them the confidence to try any challenge.

JohnIn parallel with the Crew’s growth, I was also able to have some of my own. Just before the Crew formed, I was a student in a BSA Climbing Instructor’s course. This led to me becoming a rock and ice climbing instructor in the council, which allowed me to help provide many of the Crew’s experiences above. I am fortunate to have worked with so many scouts and for my new friends in the instructors’ community.

Are instructing and participating in Base Camp’s climbing opportunities right for everyone? You will know as soon as you try.

#letsPLAYoutside

Wood Badge Helps Ensure #ScoutingTHRIVES

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Submitted by Michael Terry, Council Vice President of Program

Designed to help Scouters make scouting thrive in their communities, Wood Badge for the 21st Century is BSA’s premier training program.  It is typically run by councils, or clusters of councils in cooperation with one another, and consists, in one form or another, of six days and evenings of concentrated training on how to be better adult leaders.

The Spirit of Adventure Council is part of a cluster of councils that cooperate to run the course annually. Other cluster members include Old Colony Council and Cape and Islands Council. Annawon Council had been in our cluster until it merged into Narraganset Council.  Like most, our cluster runs Wood Badge over the course of two three-day weekends.  Our cluster just completed its second weekend this past Sunday, with 30+ learners finishing their course work at Lone Tree Camp.  There were just under twenty staff members – all volunteers — and I was lucky to be one of those.

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Wood Badge is built around the concept of a scout’s progression from Cub Scouts through Boy Scouts, with learners broken up initially into Cub Scout Dens. These groupings remain intact for the duration of the Wood Badge course, so the dens eventually become patrols. This approach is simply a device under which to organize the course, and to give adult scouters a sense of what it is like to be a Cub Scout and subsequently a Boy Scout.  Each den/patrol is assigned a Wood Badge staff member, called a guide.

Initially, the guide is extremely directive with his den, giving presentations, leading group learning and team building exercises, etc., but as the den becomes a patrol, the guide’s role evolves to be less directive and more advisory.

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Wood Badge instruction takes the best from corporate training and gives it a scouting twist:  Listening to Learn, Communications, Aims and Methods of Scouting, Managing Conflict, Embracing Change, Leave No Trace, Diversity in Scouting, and Scouts with Disabilities are just some of the topics covered during the course.  Interspersed among these presentations are worthwhile games and exercises that not only help the patrol gel as a team but instruct them as to the four stages of team development – forming, storming, norming, and performing.

Toward the end of the course, learners develop five “tickets” that they will work on and complete in the next eighteen months. Each ticket is intended to strengthen whatever part of scouting the learner is most involved in, whether a Cub Scout pack, a Boy Scout troop, Venturing crew, or district or council volunteer role.  These tickets are intended to spur the learner to take what he or she has learned over the Wood Badge weekends and put it into concrete action to make scouting thrive in his or her community.

A learner is considered to have completed Wood Badge training when he or she has completed the five tickets. At that point, the learner is presented with two wooden beads held on a leather thong, a distinctive Wood Badge neckerchief, and a leather woggle/neckerchief slide of turk’s head design.WoodBadge

So, who should take the Wood Badge course?  Anyone who wants to make scouting thrive.  Our course included Cub Masters, Committee Chairs, Scoutmasters, Assistant Scoutmasters, Venture Crew leaders, and district professionals. An added benefit?  Much of what is covered in Wood Badge is applicable at home and at work.

Already a “Wood Badger”?  Consider volunteering to serve on staff for the next course, to be held in the spring of 2017. Either way, please contact me at HERE for details.

Our Pass to Family Adventure

Submitted by Chris Jackson, Cubmaster, Pack 137 (Lexington)

Our family’s Scouting adventure started three years ago when our son saw some pictures of Pack 137 in Lexington’s previous trip to the Battleship Massachusetts. He HAD to go. He had no idea what else the Scouts did he just knew that if it included sleeping on a battleship he was in.

Since then we have become increasingly involved in the pack and with District events. Two years of Pumpkinfest (for 2 children), two years of Day camp, this year’s Overnight camp and a host of other events around our Council.

But while we have been able to do some fantastic things with the Scouts we still had to CHOOSE what events we took part in as the cost has just been prohibitive for a family of four. STEM Camp, several weekend events, and even family camp have all come second place for the main opportunities our family wanted to take advantage of.

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What the card will do for us is open up those missed opportunities.  With a large discount off overnight camp and STEM camp, we have the opportunity for him to work on Robotics and Chemistry while also keeping up with the archery, BBs, and outdoor camping he loves.  We can avoid the weekends where we struggle with “Tablet time/Screen time” and he and his sister can make New England Base Camp their second “outdoor” home.  Surprise weekend trips to one of the other camps for a day of waterfront hijinks he can share with his cousin (who he considers his best friend) now become an easy choice over a visit to a town pool or rec center.

Our son is 9.  After three years in the program he has set his sights on earning his Eagle, joining Venturing, and traveling the country (and the world) through Scouting activities. Lofty goals for sure, but not out of the question and our family will be behind him supporting him all the way. With the opportunities given to us by the New England Adventure Card program it feels like our Council is there supporting us, and allowing him to immerse himself in the Scouting experience at a level we would struggle to do without it.

Changing the Future of Camping

Submitted by Rob McLaughlin, NeXus Counselor-in-Training Co-Director

Everything is getting shaken up this summer at the Northern NeXus of Adventure including our new approach to Counselors-in-Training. All aspects of the Northern NeXus are being re-evaluated, including the CIT program that has been historically offered. Beginning this year, CIT’s at T.L. Storer and Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation will become more a part of the camp staff than ever before. Now 14 year-olds will have the opportunity to experience a full summer learning at camp by participating in all staff activities from Staff Week all the way through take down, at no cost to the CIT. Also as part of the new CIT experience, all participants in the program will attend the exclusive Staff Training and Growth Course (STAG) which will teach CIT’s leadership and team working skills through the Rare Adventures of T.L. Storer and Wah-Tut-Ca. The opportunities presented by the NeXus make this program unique in Boy Scouts.

When I was fourteen I would have loved an opportunity like this. During my own summer as a CIT at Wah-Tut-Ca Scout Reservation I had a lot of fun but this course was built to surpass that experience in every way imaginable. As a former staff member at the National Youth Leadership Training Course, a participant at Philmont’s National Advanced Youth Leadership Experience and a veteran of five years of camp staff at 3 camps, I was able to draw from a large box of involvement to develop a program that applies to the type of leadership needed not only for camp, but also for life. Some activity examples are Search and Rescue Training, Challenging Outdoor Personal Experience challenges, a youth planned backpacking outpost to a mountain in the NeXus and much more.

Another great benefit of this program stems from its change in the role of a CIT from a learning-camper to an apprentice staff member. By attending and participating in Staff Week, CIT’s will learn all the staff specific trainings and integrate fully into the camp staff. Following the completion of the STAG Course during the first week of program, CIT’s will apprentice in program areas for the rest of the summer, learning skills by being additions to the general staff members assigned to that area. As stated before, unlike previous summers participants in the program can spend their whole summer at camp for free, including the STAG leadership training course. They will even get the 25% Staff Discount at Spirit of Adventure Scout Shops to buy their summer uniforms and any other gear at the store. No other Boy Scout camp in New England offers a program like this for 14 year olds.

To apply to be a participant in the STAG Course and a CIT this summer all you have to do is fill out this electronic application. There will be two participant information meetings (both starting at 7:00 PM):

  1. May 17th in Chelmsford, MA, at Trinity Lutheran Church (170 Old Westford Rd)
  2. May 19th at New England Base Camp (411 Unquity Rd. Milton, MA)

Don’t miss out on this once in a lifetime opportunity to live the adventure at the Northern NeXus.

Creating Engagement for Scouting and Families

Submitted by Chuck Eaton, Scout Executive and CEO

Somewhere along the way I realized I have to embrace the fact that I am a crusader. For all the good and the bad that term implies – I am not rational. I am irrationally dedicated to making Scouting Thrive. It is way more than my hashtag, or my job, it’s been my life’s mission. The short hand is that parents and kids of this generation deserve the same quality experiences of previous generations and we all need the benefits that come from raising a generation of character.

The crusade is to make Scouting Thrive – I am so excited about the future! Please save the date May 3rd 7PM at EDCO. Share this link and tell your friends. If you can’t attend – log in and watch it, ask questions and participate on line. Let’s work together to provide the council and the programs this generation of Scouts deserve! ‪#‎ScoutingTHRIVES

Participate NOW, by filling out this form and sharing with PARENTS and LEADERS in your UNIT.

Can’t attend in person – please participate on the 3rd from your computer via live stream (the event will also be archived). Thanks to the Key Foundation for providing the internet broadcasting technology!

The program is brilliant, yet the organization has struggled for almost 50 years. The bigger the struggle the more energy (time, money, effort) will be required to repair the problems. Success of the council only matters when it impacts the life of a Scout.

The most rational people involved in the BSA are the folks (typically parents and unit leaders) who understand the program’s value for youth, they have an altruistic calling and they put the program to work for their child and the kids in their neighborhood. They keep all “the council stuff” at arm’s length and take the support they need were they can get it. Sadly, there are less of those folks every year. The council NEEDS to be an active partner – not a bureaucratic entity to be tolerated.

I’m told my crusade is most evident in the techniques and tenacity I employ when I attempt to un-earth the core of a problem. I flatly refuse to accept mediocrity or partial answers – yet from time to time I’m forced to tolerate it and ask others to tolerate it TEMPORARILY as we dig deeper. I ask us collectively to look the problems in the eye, socialize answers and ultimately sequence and enact the answers. This takes time.

Here is an example: For 20 years I hear people say “the Boy Scouts should do more marketing” and for 20 years the organization replies “We’ve done a ton of marketing and it’s too expensive, and non-effective, therefore we think that’s a local responsibility.” That’s NOT the answer – nor is it really the right question. Every organization in America that thrives and grows uses some type of marketing and PR. Who are we to think we can grow without it? Everyone involved in our conversation is motivated to help Scouting, yet these two statements create an impasse. In short no one is wrong – yet no one is right, so in the meantime Scouting limps along. My crusade compels me to unwind the situation. To understand the complexities I throw myself into marketing efforts and opportunities, I learn about PR so I can finally address the situation with the right context. I know that seems like a simple starting point, but it turns out our paradigm doesn’t allow the discussion to start with that sentiment. Therefore it’s very difficult to ever develop a solution. On May 3rd we’ll share the detailed plans.

Marketing is an example: The WAY we discuss marketing is more critical to creating a successful marketing plan, than the energy we put behind the actual marketing. That’s the same for paperwork, program development, unit service, parent engagement, camp program, and district / board operations and on and on. The WAY we discuss it frames the conversation and our current paradigm inadvertently closes us to certain potential solutions.

The great thing about Spirit of Adventure – we’ve already done the hardest work. We worked to alter the paradigm and now we are in unchartered territory. I know it’s a little scary out here, I’ve been on the journey for decades and trust me … we are in the home stretch.

 

I Love Scouting for ME.

Submitted by Kim Lynch, Cubmaster (Pack 105, Burlington), Teacher, Mom, and Wife

My first year of being Cubmaster is coming to an end, and I can’t tell you how many times I’ve been asked why I do it. The answers always revolve around my sons: Jarrod (a Boy Scout), Dylan (a Wolf),  and another coming into Cub Scouts in a few more years. Lynch1I start my answer with a description of loyally cheering Scouts at a Pinewood Derby, or a thrifty and creative Recyclable Rain Gutter Regatta, occasionally I include the helpful relationships between Boy Scouts and Cub Scouts (I often use this one). Maybe I include the enjoyment of warm campfires, silly skits and scrumptious s’mores, but sometimes I simply focus on the morals that Scouting instills and how they revolve around teaching boys to be good men and dads later in life.

My answers always encompass what Scouting offers my children.

It’s here that I came to realize something a little different. I love Scouting for me. As new members to our local community, Jarrod and I forged relationships we still enjoy today; people I trust with my son in every way; people who have fought for him and supported him and helped me to feel trust. Now, as a Cubmaster, I enjoy friendships that extend well past Scouting. We look forward to our monthly leader meetings where we come together as friends and plan for our next meetings.

We all enjoy our Scouting fun and our many Scouting adventures and we have similar interests as well. This year a few of us from the Wolf den enjoyed a family adventure. Our Lynch4thrill ride took us up a mountain trail in New Hampshire together. We celebrate birthdays together or even just a fire side night out. Scouting brought us all together as friends. Our similar philosophies brought us to Cub Scouting and in turn to each other.

Our differences make us strong leaders. We have a tech-savvy spreadsheet creating wiz, a hands-on crafty queen, a saleswoman-forward-thinking diva, along with an innovative idea king and a Shriner Clown who’s always willing to share a laugh or twist a balloon. Our values tie us or should I say ‘knot’ us together both in and out of Scouting.

So when people say it’s hard to make new friends, I disagree. Knowing who you are and going out in search of it will bring you right to them.
From now on, when I answer the questions about loving Scouting, I will still start off with the many rewards my children reap, those all encompassing values, but I will equally emphasize what Scouting does for me!Lynch2

Let the Rare Adventures Begin!

Submitted by Joe Dailey, Northern NeXus Rare Adventures Director

As an avid camper myself, I’ve always been an adventure seeker. Philmont, Sea Base, mountain biking, skydiving, dirt biking, ice climbing, snowboarding, you name it, I’ve probably tried it! I love being at the center of the action, and when some friends told me about the plan for an all-new adventure base for our council, I knew I had to be a part of it.

You see, while I loved summer camp, sometimes it just didn’t provide enough adventure to quench my thirst…. I would return every year, but eventually, the normal routine lost a bit of its magic.

That’s why when I was asked to be the Rare Adventures Director, I knew that with the help of the Northern NeXus leadership team, we could make this something big. Being the adventure junkie that I am – but unable to pull myself away from the summer camp that had raised me – this was the perfect role for me to use my knowledge and love of the outdoors to bring those same experiences to scouts of all ages.

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Along with the rest of the leadership team, I promise every scout that enters a NeXus camp that they’ll get to enjoy a unique High Adventure experience, guaranteed!

My vision is that, together, we can build a new standard for summer camp experiences, the likes of which has never been seen, and show all the other Boy Scout camps and councils that here in the Spirit of Adventure Council, Scouting Truly Does Thrive!

Varying in length and difficulty, the Rare Adventures will provide new experiences to scouts of all ages and skill levels. Some examples are:

  • Learn advanced sailing techniques on the Craig Ryder, exploring the beautiful and expansive Northwood Lake!
  • Grab a friend and take on the allnew Vertical Caving Tower at T. L. Storer, climbing, crawling, and rappelling through a vertical maze!
  • Gather your patrol or troop and head out to Parker Mountain for an overnight survival simulation!
  • Units will even have the opportunity to work with the NeXus staff and build their own Rare Adventure.

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Whatever your path, you’re guaranteed a one-of-a-kind experience, only available at the Northern NeXus of Adventure.

In addition to this incredible new program, scouts will be able to earn points for participating in Rare Adventures, which can then be applied towards earning the all new Spirit of Adventure Camping Award! Multitiered and comprising a number of different components, this award will be offered on the individual, patrol, and troop levels, giving scouts the chance to challenge themselves not only individually but also as a team, working together to obtain the never before seen Spirit of Adventure Troop Award! Scouts will receive patches and awards as they progress through the various levels.

Making Friends through Scouting

Submitted by Diane Trubiano, Cub Scout Leader and Scout Parent.

Since Pumpkin Fest in October, my son Paul and I have had quite the adventure adding to our scouting story.  Paul ECoHHe started college, completed hiking all 48 of the 4000 footers in New Hampshire, and most excitingly earned the Rank of Eagle Scout. It was a great celebration (and moment of pride for me as his mom) to start 2016.

To pick up where I left off last year; it is safe to say that a good number of the people I am close to and call friends are people I have met through Scouting. If you look at my Facebook friends list, it is made up of all Scouts and family.  We see each other weekly in Pack and Troop meetings, then at the district and council level each month. I know families that see less of each other than that! We all of course bond over the common interest of Scouting and our commitment to the youth we serve. As we share stories about our favorite Scouting moments, it often feels as though Scouts and their parents become like family to you.

Some of the nicest people I have ever met are through the Scouting program. friendsAs
dedicated parents, we understand the long hours and time away from home, the need for taking our units camping for weekends and weeks at summer camp, hiking mountains with 50 pound back packs, passing swim tests at summer camp, challenging youth to do more than they thought they could. Shared interests, experiences, and campfires are what bring us together to meet and make new friends through the fellowship Scouting offers us as adults and youth.

When I was asked to help recruit 10,000 participants to join us at SOAR – Scouting’s Outdoor Adventure on the River in 2016,  I saw it as a great opportunity to make 10,000 new Scouting Friends. To share an event this big with so many Boy Scouts, Cub Scouts, Venturers, and Scout Leaders from all over the Northeast is an opportunity not to be missed!

Please join me and share in a memorable experience with thousands of new friends at SOAR 2016 – Scouting’s Outdoor Adventure on the River October 8-10, 2016! I am very much looking forward to the opportunity for fellowship with all of you 😊
SOARClick to reserve your spot on the banks of the Charles River for the day (10/9) or the whole weekend.