Category Archives: Scouts BSA

Camperships

Thank you for considering making a donation to the campership fund. These funds are available to all Scouts and ensure that any Scout wishing to attend camp or participate in Scout programs can regardless of their family’s financial position. Last year we provided over $100,000 in camperships to Scouts from almost every one of our 76 communities and cities. Charitable contributions toward Camperships are restricted.

  • Camperships help create equity for all communities.

By providing year-round program enhancements, the Scout council enables all Scouts to have access to all that Scouting has to offer. The curriculum is robust and allows each Scout to design their own individualized learning program based on their interests. However, for many the interests outpace the resources available in their community. The Base Camp offerings put everything from Ice climbing to robotics to civic engagement in the hands of ALL SCOUTS. The Campership programs creates that even playing field that all children deserve.

The Campership program seeks to increase the number of children enjoying outdoor experiences at Spirit of Adventure Council camps and programs by providing financial assistance to our members who wish to participate in our programs. To be eligible, a family must complete an application form, including details regarding family situation and Scouting participation.

It is expected that the family will fund some portion of the child's expense; the Council will strive to subsidize the remainder. As a rule of thumb, the Council is willing to support funding based on need.

* All applications must be received at least four weeks prior to the program - but the earlier the better and families will have a greater chance of larger disbursements the earlier they apply.
* All funds will be awarded based on need and available funds. All applications will be considered on a first come first served basis.

Scouts can fill out the Campership form to apply for financial assistance HERE. 

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Scouting in Today’s Society

Utilizing our Diversity Task Force

Submitted by Chuck Eaton, Scout Executive

In the past nine months, we assembled a diversity and inclusion task force to review, and better understand Scouting’s relationship toward our diverse, melting pot /pluralist society. Our mission was to develop a roadmap that would ultimately unlock the program of Scouting for all families that want to raise children of character. It’s part of our strategic plan which is still under review – but diversity road map was met with enthusiasm and broad support.

I deeply enjoyed working with the folks on this task force. Over the nine months, the size and make up of the group accordioned with various projects. There were nine formal members, yet in its widest interputation there were about 20 diverse people who contributed to build the roadmap.
 

 

While we were conducting our work to present our proposal, the national organization began researching and considering allowing girls to join the BSA at all levels.

 

It seems to me during Scouting’s hey day the 1930s through the late 1960s Scouting enjoyed universal appeal. Yet today, only a percentage of American families consider Scouting as a valuable, fun, community character education program for their kids. Ironically the American public widely views Scouting and it’s activities and outcomes in a positive light. When you talk to non-Scout families it sounds like this “I know Scouting does good things for the kids involved, it’s just not for us.” Or “Those activities seem exciting and valuable to my kids, but we do something else.” That sentiment is not just my opinion and observation, the BSA has done an enormous amount of market research and that is the common and consistent response.

 

Sadly, even with so much market research over decades all pointing to the same truth, Scouting still didn’t know what to do. Although there have been sincere, genuine efforts over the past few decades, those efforts never seem to make long lasting sustainable impact. The key ingredient that was missing the willingness to widely and truly embrace.

 

It’s my observation that in the 30s through the late 60s when Scouting enjoyed universal appeal. It did so because America valued a homogenous society. (Admittedly – I am not a sociologist!) Whether you were black, white, buddhist, gay, straight, male, female, Latino, immigrant or native society pushed you towards the American dream of apple pie and a white picket fence. Scouting tapped into and reflected that idea. Today, while the white picket fence is still a highly regarded ideal, we more willingly embrace each American’s right to determine “The pursuit of happiness” in their own terms.

 

This is a culture change and this is hard work.

 

However, a core belief in Scouting has always been that communities self-determine. Our common ground is that every family agrees to the ideals of the Scout Oath and Law:
A Scout is friendly. A Scout is a friend to all. He is a brother to other Scouts. He offers his friendship to people of all races and nations, and respects them even if their beliefs and customs are different from his own.

 

Beyond that common ground (and safety!) all Scout communities self determine how they utilize the curriculum. To that end, each scout troop reflects its own community and culture. And the Scouting organization understands that, respects that, and defends that. While respecting and supporting each community’s unique culture and self determination we will simultaneously offer friendship to all.

 

New Eagle Scout Recognition Process

Eagle Court of Honor

One of the greatest moments in the Eagle Scout process is the Court of Honor. This is the event that celebrates your success with those who helped you and the rest of the community. We’d like to share some advice that may help make your special event even a little more special.  Please use this as a guide to help the community celebrate.

Invite the following to share in your special day:

Your Community

  • All the parents, Scouts, and leaders who assisted you on your trail to Eagle, including your project
  • Any vendors or donors who helped
  • The non-profit or recipient of your efforts
  • The Institutional Head of your chartered organization
  • Elected Officials or other community leaders
  • Extended family – they likely helped you in ways you may not yet realize

The Scouting Community

  •  Your troop
  •  Camp directors, merit badge counselors, and countless others that helped behind the scenes to help make Scouting thrive

In addition, your council would love to have a representative on hand to celebrate on that special day, and to present a certificate in recognition of your achievement. Once you have selected your Court of Honor date, please send an invitation to:

The Spirit of Adventure Council, 2 Tower Office Park, Woburn, MA 01801

Send Out Public Announcements

  • List your Eagle Award in your chartered organization newsletter or bulletin
  • Send a press release to the local media.  
  • Take a picture RIGHT NOW with your family, and post to your social media outlets. Tag your Scouting Community and The Spirit of Adventure Facebook site.

 

  Other Helpful Information

  • The National Eagle Association offers several academic and merit scholarships.  Be sure to bookmark NESA.org, read about the offerings, and set a reminder for yourself to apply.  There is a fairly tight window of opportunity to do this and all submissions must be completed online by October 31 of each year.
  • As a bonus, each Eagle Scout who applies for a national NESA scholarship is automatically entered for consideration for our Spirit of Adventure NESA scholarship.
  • There is also the Glenn A. and Melinda W. Adams Award.  This is a service project of the year award.  Each council selects one recipient and our selection is further considered at the regional and national levels, which have cash awards attached to them.  The form for this award can also be found on NESA.org.  Send the completed form, along with a copy of your Eagle project workbook by next January 21, to the Spirit Adventure Council at the Woburn address.
  • Finally, Scouts will receive an invitation in the future to attend our annual Eagle Scout recognition dinner.

Adult Leader Training

Three Steps to Becoming a Trained Leader

STEP ONE: SET UP A MY.SCOUTING ACCOUNT

Visit My.Scouting  and create an account.  Once you have an account you can access online training.

STEP TWO: TAKE YOUTH PROTECTION TRAINING

The Boy Scouts of America places the greatest importance on creating the most secure environment possible for our youth members.

BSA Youth Protection

STEP THREE: POSITION SPECIFIC TRAINING

The BSA Learning Center is at My.Scouting.  Select your position and a learning plan will be created for you.  The plan includes modules that are designed to allow you to complete them at your own pace.

Position Training

Leaders who complete Youth Protection Training and Position Specific Training earn the right to wear the trained patch on the left sleeve of their uniform, beneath the patch representing the position for which they are trained.  Position Specific Courses

Additional Training

Basic Adult Leader Outdoor Orientation – BALOO

This one-and-a-half day course is designed as an introduction to the Cub Scout outdoor program for leaders interested in adding a camping component to their Pack activities. BALOO training consists of an online pre-requisite component in addition to an overnight outdoor camping experience. Completion of this course is mandatory for a MINIMUM OF ONE adult on a Pack overnighter.

  • BALOO - NLD - 5/4 - West Newbury

Other trainings:

  • Trainers Edge & Fundamentals of Training - 3/23
  • Venturing Mentoring Training - 4/16

IOLS Training

This hands-on program gives adult leaders a practical introduction to the patrol method of a Scout led troop by teaching many of the practical outdoor skills they need to lead Scouts in the out-of-doors.

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Powderhorn

Powder Horn is a skills resource course for Venturing and Scouts BSA leaders and youth (age 14 and up) of the Boy Scouts of America (BSA). ... Powder Horn presents a wide variety of hands-on high adventure skills experiences, and thus is not designed to provide specific skills certifications.

 

Wood Badge

Wood Badge is Scouting's premier training course. Baden-Powell designed it so that Scouters could learn, in as practical a way possible, the skills and methods of Scouting. It is first and foremost, learning by doing. The members of the course are formed into patrols and these into a troop.  The entire troop camps in the outdoors, camping, cooking their own meals, and practices Scout skills while honing their leadership and teamwork.

Next course will be held April 12-14 &  at T.L. Storer Scout Reservation - stay tuned for more details